Barefoot Running University » Don’t Get Couch Potato Feet

Barefoot Running University » Don’t Get Couch Potato Feet
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Healthy feet are allowed to move, flex, and explore. They’re given a steady diet of new terrain, plenty of dynamic movements, and lots of time in the open air. These feet grow strong, capable, and independent. They only need shoes for protection from excessive temperatures or rough terrain, or occasionally for running really fast or long.

Using Sand to Analyze Your Running Form | Barefoot Running University

Jason Robillard at Barefoot Running University:

Interestingly, you can also analyze their form by their footprints left in the sand.  This could be useful to you for analyzing your own form.  It could also make for a pretty nifty parlor trick.  You know… to impress the ladies.

This is an interesting article about how to “read” footprints in beach sand to understand the runner’s technique. Not sure about impressing the ladies, though.

“Play Is The Process. Fitness is the Product.” Embrace Play to Revolutionize Your Running, Then Your Life | Barefoot Running University

Jason Robillard at Barefoot Running University:

All too often, we focus exclusively on outcomes.  We care about finishing a distance, doing so in a specific time, or placing in a certain position.  If we DO focus on the process, we tend to obsess over pacing, heart rate, weekly mileage, or worrying about how our run will look when we post in on Facebook using Daily Mile.

His suggestion… running should be play. Good article.

Barefoot Running University » The Heel Striking Experiment: Why Bad Form is Stupid

Barefoot Running University » The Heel Striking Experiment: Why Bad Form is Stupid

Driving your heel into the ground with every step creates a braking force that slows your forward momentum.  Every step is reduced to a braking action with slows forward movement followed immediately by a pushing off force to re-accelerate to maintain pace.  Here’s an experiment for heel strikers:

Situation 1: Get in your car.  Go to a road with no traffic. Accelerate for one mile without touching the brake.  Notice it’s smooth and seamless.  This is equivalent to running with good form.

Situation 2: Now do the same thing, except this time tap your brakes about 140 times each minute as you drive the same mile. This is what you are doing when you overstride with a heel strike.

How did that work out for you?  Notice a significant difference?

This is a great metaphor to explain the difference between heel and mid or front foot striking.

For years, I was a heel sticker and I still need to constantly be mindful of my form as I run. Sometimes I catch myself letting go and loosing form.

Someone in the comments of that post wrote:

Fred Flinstone used his heels to stop his car… Not speed up.

Brilliant.